SELENE Lunar Orbiter Greatest Space Technology

SELENE Lunar Orbiter (also known as KAGUYA) lunar orbiter was a Japanese unmanned spacecraft launched in 2007. It was the second Japanese lunar orbiter mission, following the orbiter Hiten (also known as MUSES-A). SELENE was designed to collect data on the moon’s origin and evolution, and to help prepare for future manned exploration of the moon.

The spacecraft was equipped with a high-definition television camera, a synthetic aperture radar, a laser altimeter, and a gamma ray spectrometer. SELENE’s orbit was deliberately low, only 50–60 kilometers (31–37 miles) above the surface, so that its instruments could make very precise measurements. The mission ended in 2009 when the spacecraft was deliberately crashed into the moon’s surface.

The data collected by SELENE has been used to create a high-resolution map of the moon’s surface. This map has reveal new details about the moon’s topography, crust, and interior structure. The data has also been use to study the moon’s environment, including the effects of solar wind and cosmic radiation on the lunar surface.

Overview

The SELENE (Speleological and Engineering Explorer) was a Japanese unman lunar orbiter. SELENE was also referr to by its nickname Kagura, after the lunar princess Kaguya-hime. The orbiter launch on September 14, 2007, from Tanegashima Space Center on a H-IIA rocket, and entered orbit around the Moon on October 4, 2007. It was the largest lunar probe since the Apollo missions and the first lunar probe launch by a country other than the United States or the Soviet Union/Russia. The mission last for about a year and a half, and end when the orbiter was intentionally crash into the lunar surface on June 10, 2009. SELENE was design to achieve the following scientific objectives:

  •  Global three-dimensional mapping of the lunar surface
  •  Composition and structure of the lunar interior
  •  Evolution of the lunar surface

 Lunar environment (radiation, surface temperature, etc.) SELENE carried a total of 13 scientific instruments. The orbiter also Carri two small sub-satellites, the Okine and the Osuna, which were release during the mission to study the lunar gravity field. The orbiter’s mission was divide into three phases: the first was a two-week commissioning phase, during which the orbiter’s systems were test and calibrate; the second was a one-year science phase; and the third was a two-week decommissioning phase, during which the orbiter’s systems were shut down and it was prepare for impact. SELENE complete its mission as plan, and was intentionally crash into the lunar surface on June 10, 2009, at a site call the Von Kármán crater. 

Instruments

The SELENE (Speleological and Engineering Explorer) lunar orbiter was a Japanese spacecraft launch in 2007. It was the second Japanese lunar mission after the Hiten probe, and the first lunar orbiter launch since the Smart-1 orbiter of the European Space Agency. The spacecraft orbit the Moon for about a year, collecting data that was use to create a three-dimensional atlas of the Moon’s surface. The SELENE orbiter Carri a total of eleven scientific instruments, six of which were mount on the orbiter’s main body, and five on an attach subsatellite.

The main orbiter instruments were the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC), the Terrain Camera (TC), the Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS), the Lunar X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (LXIS), the Soft X-ray Telescope (SXRT), and the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). The HRSC was the primary imaging instrument, and was use to create high-resolution 3D maps of the Moon’s surface. The TC was a lower-resolution imaging instrument use to create maps of the lunar terrain. The LRS was use to measure the topography of the lunar surface, while the LXIS was use to map the distribution of elements on the lunar surface.

SELENE Lunar Orbiter

The SXRT and GRS were use to study the Moon’s surface and subsurface composition, respectively. The SELENE orbiter also Carri a subsatellite, the Lunar Atmospheric and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE). The LADEE Carri two instruments, the Lunar Dust Mass Monitor (LDMM) and the Neutral Mass Spectrometer (NMS). The LDMM was use to measure the amount of dust in the lunar atmosphere, while the NMS was use to analyze the composition of the lunar atmosphere. The SELENE mission was a successful one, and the data collect by the orbiter’s instruments has been use to further our understanding of the Moon.

Mission

The SELENE (Speleological and Engineering Explorer) lunar orbiter mission was a Japanese spacecraft launched on September 14, 2007. The mission’s primary objective was to gather data to aid in understanding the Moon’s formation and evolution, and to collect data for use in landing future robotic and human missions on the Moon. SELENE also had the goal of demonstrating sustainable lunar exploration technologies. SELENE was launch on an H-IIA rocket from the Tanegashima Space Center. The spacecraft enter lunar orbit on October 4, 2007.

It then began a 15-month scientific mission, which include mapping the Moon’s surface composition and temperature. The spacecraft also release two small probes, the Luna-A and the Selene-B, which impact the lunar surface. SELENE’s mission end on October 31, 2008, when the spacecraft was intentionally crash into the Moon.

This was done in order to avoid the possibility of the spacecraft impacting the lunar. Surface and contaminating potential future landing sites. The data collect by SELENE has been use to create a detail map of the Moon’s surface. This map has been use to select potential landing sites for future missions. The data has also been use to improve our understanding of the Moon’s formation and evolution.

Data

In 2003, Japan launch the Selene lunar orbiter on a mission to study the moon. The orbiter Carri a number of instruments, including a high-resolution camera. Which took more than 1.6 million images of the moon’s surface. These images were use to create a global map of the moon’s topography. The Selene orbiter also Carri a laser altimeter, which measure the height of features on the surface. This data was use to create a three-dimensional map of the moon’s surface.

The Selene orbiter also Carrie a gamma-ray spectrometer, which measure the composition of the moon’s surface. This data was use to create a map of the moon’s elemental composition. The data from the Selene orbiter has been use to create a number of scientific papers. Which have been publish in peer-review journals. The data has also been use to create a number of public outreach products, including a 3D moon viewer and an online moon atlas.

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